City-Wide

RenewableNY

Intro Paragraph: 
In 2005, the New York Industrial Retention Network (NYIRN), now a part of the Pratt Center for Community Development, launched an initiative that combined project management and small grants to encourage industrial companies in New York City to implement energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.
RenewableNY combined project management and small grants to encourage industrial companies in New York City to implement energy efficiency projects.
Body: 

Projects ranged from simple lighting upgrades to more complex solar energy systems, cogeneration units, energy efficient processing equipment, and other measures. The projects leveraged an additional $2 million in funds...

Project Status: 
Archived
Location: 

Brownfield Redevelopment Planning

Intro Paragraph: 
Brownfields – defined by the EPA as “real property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence…of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant” – are littered throughout many of NYC’s low- and moderate-income communities.
Pratt Center works with local organizations to plan for the sustainable redevelopment of brownfields in low- and moderate-income communities.
Body: 

The product of deindustrialization, disinvestment and abandonment, brownfields are a barrier to local economic development, sustainable open space and quality public health, in addition to a blight on communities’ landscapes and well-being. 

Pratt Center has been a longtime...

Project Status: 
Active
Who's Working on this Project?: 
Vicki Weiner
Paula Crespo
Jessie Braden
Location: 

Communities United for Transportation Equity

Intro Paragraph: 
COMMUTE is a coalition of New York City community groups that initially came together in 2007 to make congestion pricing work for working families, by advocating for the use of congestion pricing revenues to finance mass-transit investments benefiting underserved communities and low-income commuters.
COMMUTE collaborated with Pratt Center to develop a plan for a citywide Bus Rapid Transit network.
Body: 

COMMUTE is now continuing its work to promote mass-transit investments for inadequately served low-income New Yorkers. The Pratt Center is coordinating COMMUTE and providing supporting research.

COMMUTE members include:

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Project Status: 
Archived
Who's Working on this Project?: 
Elena Conte
Location: 

Distribution Opportunities for Small Food Manufacturers

Intro Paragraph: 
between 2008 and 2012, the number of food and beverage manufacturing firms grew significantly in New York City.
NYC's burgeoning food manufacturing sector can continue to grow and create jobs through the facilitation of third party product distribution.
Body: 

The sector saw growth of over 11% between 2008 and 2012, notably higher than the 7% increase for all businesses in the five boroughs, and this growth shows no sign of slowing down. However, in order for new food and beverage manufacturing firms to increase consumer demand, they need access to...

Project Status: 
Archived
Who's Working on this Project?: 
Jen Becker
Location: 

Bus Rapid Transit

Intro Paragraph: 
For most low- and moderate-income communities throughout New York City, limited access to public transportation remains a considerable challenge.
Pratt Center is a leading advocate for BRT – a low cost approach to shortening commutes for thousands of New Yorkers and closing disparities in transit access.
Body: 

Although the city’s economy is dependent on its strong public transit system, workers in densely-populated peripheral areas often cannot efficiently access places of employment and other much-needed economic opportunities. Over 750,000 New York City workers commute over an hour each way...

Project Status: 
Archived
Who's Working on this Project?: 
Elena Conte
Location: 

Planning for Neighborhood Retail

Intro Paragraph: 
Local shopping districts with a range of retail and community-responsive services are integral to socially and economically healthy neighborhoods. But many of New York City’s low- and moderate-income communities are without thriving commercial areas.
Diverse commercial corridors with thriving locally-owned businesses lead to prosperous and vibrant neighborhoods.
Body: 

Dilapidated commercial space, big box store development, poorly planned corridors, and rising storefront rents are but a few examples of the everyday challenges facing local merchants – from new entrepreneurs to small businesses that have been around for decades.

As part of our...

Project Status: 
Active
Who's Working on this Project?: 
Paula Crespo
Location: 

Post-Sandy Resiliency Planning

Intro Paragraph: 
Hurricane Sandy exposed not only the urgent need for resiliency planning across New York City, but the disparate impact of climate change on low- and moderate-income communities and small businesses along the city’s waterfront.
In the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, Pratt Center is working to develop community-driven long-term resiliency strategies.
Body: 

From the NYCHA tenants who lived without electricity and gas for months to the Brooklyn Navy Yard manufacturers whose equipment and inventory were destroyed, Hurricane Sandy overwhelmingly affected New Yorkers without the economic, technical and political resources to quickly respond and...

Project Status: 
Archived
Who's Working on this Project?: 
Elena Conte
Location: 

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